$1B+ Market Map: The World’s 183 Unicorn Companies In One Infographic

Here are some notable takeaways on the companies in our market map:

  • Three companies became unicorns this year: China based Q&A website Zhihu and office space company URwork, and US-based cloud video conferencing company Zoom Communications.
  • The most valuable private company in the world is Uber, valued at $68B. Rounding out the top five are: Xiaomi ($46B), Didi Chuxing ($34B), Airbnb ($29B), and Palantir Technologies ($20B).
  • Fifteen private companies (8% of the global unicorn club) are considered decacorns and are worth $10B+. Approximately 32% of the companies included in the global unicorn club are valued at exactly $1B.
  • The majority of the world’s unicorns are based in the US (55%), followed by China (21%), India (4%), the UK (4%), Germany (2%), and South Korea (2%). No other country has three or more private companies valued at $1B+.

Source: CB Insights

Sometimes A Startup Has To Seek Permission To Change The World

Elon Musk has joked that experts call the Hyperloop either obvious — or impossible. We believe it is possible, but we face some difficult challenges unlike those faced by most tech startups. 



SpaceX’s Plan to Provide Internet from Orbit Edges Closer to Launch

Forward to the Future: Making Fuel from Old Clothes

Forward to the Future: Making Fuel from Old Clothes

28:00
Broadcast on September 1, 2016
Recycling Entrepreneur – Masaki Takao

The 1989 Hollywood hit Back to the Future Part II, saw a time-travelling DeLorean return from the year 2015, fitted with a device to use trash as fuel. Fast forward to the real 2015 to meet Masaki Takao, the man who made this technology a reality by recycling discarded clothing to make biofuel as well as developing recycling techniques, Takao has enlisted retailers and the government to engage the public in a groundbreaking garment-collection scheme. Now he hopes recycling can change the world.
Available until September 15, 2016

3Doodler 2.0 Launch Video – The World’s First 3D Printing Pen, Reinvente…

“When we first launched the 3Doodler we asked the world to imagine a pen that could literally draw in the air.

Two years on, we’ve made the world’s first 3D printing pen even better, with a new and improved version that’s slimmer, lighter, quieter, and even easier to use.

The 3Doodler heats, then rapidly cools plastic, allowing instant 3D creation; and with no software or
computers, the possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

We’ve shipped over 130,000 first generation 3Doodlers; and our community has used them to create amazing things: from jewellery, to RC planes, fully 3Doodled dresses, architectural models, and even writing braille.

It was because of the support of this Kickstarter community that we were able to make the 3Doodler dream a reality. To say thank you, we’ve decided to bring 3Doodler 2.0 to you first!

Completely redesigned from top to bottom, and housed in a sleek aluminium casing, the new 3Doodler is the result of over two years of research and development, all aimed at giving you the best 3Doodling experience possible.

The new 3Doodler is also packed with loads of enhancements, making it smoother, sleeker, and easier to use than ever before.

We’re also releasing exciting new accessories, including the JetPack, a portable power pack that gives you the freedom to 3Doodle on the go.

To help kickstart creativity in the classroom we’ve created a special educational bundle – complete with pens, plastic, accessories and curricular materials – which you can send to any school, library or
makerspace of your choosing.

If you can draw, write or wave a finger in the air you can create with the 3Doodler.

Our Community website has hundreds of projects and stencils that you can download for free; and it’s filled with how-to videos and images of inspiring creations from around the world.

So when will you get your new 3Doodler?

We’ll start shipping to our first backers within a few weeks; and the majority of you will be 3Doodling by April.

We can’t thank you enough for joining us on this amazing journey.”

3Doodler 2.0 Launch Video – The World’s First 3D Printing Pen, Reinvente…

“When we first launched the 3Doodler we asked the world to imagine a pen that could literally draw in the air.

Two years on, we’ve made the world’s first 3D printing pen even better, with a new and improved version that’s slimmer, lighter, quieter, and even easier to use.

The 3Doodler heats, then rapidly cools plastic, allowing instant 3D creation; and with no software or
computers, the possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

We’ve shipped over 130,000 first generation 3Doodlers; and our community has used them to create amazing things: from jewellery, to RC planes, fully 3Doodled dresses, architectural models, and even writing braille.

It was because of the support of this Kickstarter community that we were able to make the 3Doodler dream a reality. To say thank you, we’ve decided to bring 3Doodler 2.0 to you first!

Completely redesigned from top to bottom, and housed in a sleek aluminium casing, the new 3Doodler is the result of over two years of research and development, all aimed at giving you the best 3Doodling experience possible.

The new 3Doodler is also packed with loads of enhancements, making it smoother, sleeker, and easier to use than ever before.

We’re also releasing exciting new accessories, including the JetPack, a portable power pack that gives you the freedom to 3Doodle on the go.

To help kickstart creativity in the classroom we’ve created a special educational bundle – complete with pens, plastic, accessories and curricular materials – which you can send to any school, library or
makerspace of your choosing.

If you can draw, write or wave a finger in the air you can create with the 3Doodler.

Our Community website has hundreds of projects and stencils that you can download for free; and it’s filled with how-to videos and images of inspiring creations from around the world.

So when will you get your new 3Doodler?

We’ll start shipping to our first backers within a few weeks; and the majority of you will be 3Doodling by April.

We can’t thank you enough for joining us on this amazing journey.”

Glen Keane – Step into the Page

Over nearly four decades at Disney, Glen Keane animated some the most compelling characters of our time: Ariel from The Little Mermaid, the titular beast in Beauty and the Beast, and Disney’s Tarzan, to name just a few. The son of cartoonist Bil Keane (The Family Circus), Glen learned early on the importance of holding onto your childhood creativity—and how art can powerfully convey emotion. Keane has spent his career embracing new tools, from digital environments to 3D animation to today’s virtual reality, which finally enables him to step into his drawings and wander freely through his imagination. At FoST, he’ll explore how to tap into your own creativity, connecting to emotion and character more directly than ever before.

Glen Keane – Step into the Page

Over nearly four decades at Disney, Glen Keane animated some the most compelling characters of our time: Ariel from The Little Mermaid, the titular beast in Beauty and the Beast, and Disney’s Tarzan, to name just a few. The son of cartoonist Bil Keane (The Family Circus), Glen learned early on the importance of holding onto your childhood creativity—and how art can powerfully convey emotion. Keane has spent his career embracing new tools, from digital environments to 3D animation to today’s virtual reality, which finally enables him to step into his drawings and wander freely through his imagination. At FoST, he’ll explore how to tap into your own creativity, connecting to emotion and character more directly than ever before.

What Is Disruptive Innovation?

Executive Summary

For the past 20 years, the theory of disruptive innovation has been enormously influential in business circles and a powerful tool for predicting which industry entrants will succeed. Unfortunately, the theory has also been widely misunderstood, and the “disruptive” label has been applied too carelessly anytime a market newcomer shakes up well-established incumbents.
In this article, the architect of disruption theory, Clayton M. Christensen, and his coauthors correct some of the misinformation, describe how the thinking on the subject has evolved, and discuss the utility of the theory.
They start by clarifying what classic disruption entails—a small enterprise targeting overlooked customers with a novel but modest offering and gradually moving upmarket to challenge the industry leaders. They point out that Uber, commonly hailed as a disrupter, doesn’t actually fit the mold, and they explain that if managers don’t understand the nuances of disruption theory or apply its tenets correctly, they may not make the right strategic choices. Common mistakes, the authors say, include failing to view disruption as a gradual process (which may lead incumbents to ignore significant threats) and blindly accepting the “Disrupt or be disrupted” mantra (which may lead incumbents to jeopardize their core business as they try to defend against disruptive competitors).
The authors acknowledge that disruption theory has certain limitations. But they are confident that as research continues, the theory’s explanatory and predictive powers will only improve.
Credit: HBR

What Is Disruptive Innovation?

Executive Summary

For the past 20 years, the theory of disruptive innovation has been enormously influential in business circles and a powerful tool for predicting which industry entrants will succeed. Unfortunately, the theory has also been widely misunderstood, and the “disruptive” label has been applied too carelessly anytime a market newcomer shakes up well-established incumbents.
In this article, the architect of disruption theory, Clayton M. Christensen, and his coauthors correct some of the misinformation, describe how the thinking on the subject has evolved, and discuss the utility of the theory.
They start by clarifying what classic disruption entails—a small enterprise targeting overlooked customers with a novel but modest offering and gradually moving upmarket to challenge the industry leaders. They point out that Uber, commonly hailed as a disrupter, doesn’t actually fit the mold, and they explain that if managers don’t understand the nuances of disruption theory or apply its tenets correctly, they may not make the right strategic choices. Common mistakes, the authors say, include failing to view disruption as a gradual process (which may lead incumbents to ignore significant threats) and blindly accepting the “Disrupt or be disrupted” mantra (which may lead incumbents to jeopardize their core business as they try to defend against disruptive competitors).
The authors acknowledge that disruption theory has certain limitations. But they are confident that as research continues, the theory’s explanatory and predictive powers will only improve.
Credit: HBR